Apr 19, 2012

Human Statue Bodyart: Sydney based fitness reality TV show gets bodypaint







Shine Australia is the latest Australian television production company to company to stand out from the pack using bodypaint in their television programming.

A reality TV program being filmed in Sydney's Sutherland shire will have some personal fitness trainers decked out in bodypaint, as part of their team identification.

The addition of bodypainted fitness trainers helped their already sexy and sporty show reach a new level of excitement, lifeforce and wow factor.

The bodypaint component is helping generating positive buzz for the production and will help the show become even more topical fodder for under the watercooler, powered along by social media and positive word of mouth.

Shine Australia continues to innovate in Australian television production with fresh and outside the box media and marketing campaigns.
Stay tuned to this station for more details of the upcoming reality TV show featuring the always popular bodypaint and bodyart.








Websites

Shine Australia

Shine Group

Human Statue Bodyart

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr

Apr 13, 2012

Human Statue Bodyart

Via Flickr:
Human Statue Bodyart Gold Statue Facilitates Golden Product Showcase Event For Alloys I.T In Sydney, Australia

The Alloys I.T and print and imaging distributor company based in Sydney's North Ryde is the latest technology based firm to stand out from the pack using human statues at their yearly showcase event.

I.T and print imaging distribution may sound moderately sexy, but with the addition of a golden painted and decorated human statue, their moderately sexy event came to life and achieved a real wow factor.

The human statue model mingled with management, distributors and other event attendees, showing off the various impressive information technology products and services on display.

Alloy's is committed to maintaining their position as one of Australia's most innovative and customer / distributor focused I.T companies, and their use of a human state model and campaign demonstrates their leadership and mindset to not just be average and be one of the pack - but rather to stand out from the pack, showing innovation, daring and creativity.

The statue campaign was effective as it helped attract more A list attendees, positive press, as well as generating positive buzz for the firm in the Australian I.T and distribution industry.

Alloy's continues to innovate in an ultra impressive fashion - be it with products, services, or with outside the box media and marketing campaigns. As their trademark saying goes - "The non traditional distributor".

Product suite of Alloy's include:

Single and Multifunction Printers
Copier Devices
Large Format Printers
Direct to Garment Printers
IP Surveillance Cameras and Software
High-Speed Document Scanners and Software solutions
Home Automation Products
Multimedia Projectors
Storage Media

Websites

Alloy's
www.alloys.com.au

Human Statue Bodyart
www.humanstatuebodyart.com.au

Human Statue Bodyart Flickr
www.flickr.com/humanstatuebodyart

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr
www.flickr.com/evarinaldiphotography

Eva Rinaldi Photography
www.evarinaldi.com

Apr 12, 2012

Human Statue Bodyart Gold Statue Facilitates Golden Product Showcase Event For Alloys I.T In Sydney, Australia






The Alloys I.T and print and imaging distributor company based in Sydney's North Ryde is the latest technology based firm to stand out from the pack using human statues at their yearly showcase event.

I.T and print imaging distribution may sound moderately sexy, but with the addition of a golden painted and decorated human statue, their moderately sexy event came to life and achieved a real wow factor.

The human statue model mingled with management, distributors and other event attendees, showing off the various impressive information technology products and services on display.

Alloy's is committed to maintaining their position as one of Australia's most innovative and customer / distributor focused I.T companies, and their use of a human state model and campaign demonstrates their leadership and mindset to not just be average and be one of the pack - but rather to stand out from the pack, showing innovation, daring and creativity.

The statue campaign was effective as it helped attract more A list attendees, positive press, as well as generating positive buzz for the firm in the Australian I.T and distribution industry.

Alloy's continues to innovate in an ultra impressive fashion - be it with products, services, or with outside the box media and marketing campaigns. As their trademark saying goes - "The non traditional distributor".

Product suite of Alloy's include:

Single and Multifunction Printers
Copier Devices
Large Format Printers
Direct to Garment Printers
IP Surveillance Cameras and Software
High-Speed Document Scanners and Software solutions
Home Automation Products
Multimedia Projectors
Storage Media












Websites

Alloy's

Human Statue Bodyart

Human Statue Bodyart Flickr

Eva Rinaldi Photography Flickr

Eva Rinaldi Photography

Apr 7, 2012

Body painting helps anatomy lessons: study





Students learn human anatomy better when they can paint body parts on a real live body, one Australian expert says.

Professor Paul McMenamin of the University of Western Australia reports on the use of body painting in anatomy classes in the journal Anatomical Sciences Education.

"Essentially we're using a three-dimensional canvas in the shape of the body," said Professor McMenamin, who has been using body painting in classes for about four years.

"You can paint the muscles on and bring them to life," he says.

"It's just fantastic when you see it. People just go 'oh my God'."

Professor McMenamin says when students paint muscles, tendons, nerves, blood vessels and even organs like the heart, on a model or on each other, the visual impact helps them learn more than they would otherwise.

"They see the heart and it's almost as if it's there in front of them," he says.

"As if they'd ripped the skin and ribs off and the heart's right there."

Professor McMenamin says body painting is not meant to replace other anatomy teaching methods, but helps students to bring together text-book and other knowledge on a real live person.

He says students in body painting class wear swimwear that can be painted on, and the only limitation tends to come when drawing hearts.

Professor McMenamin says in females the heart is under the breast so it is generally only drawn on males.

He hopes the method will also help young students get used to having physical contact with patients.

Body painting takes off
Professor McMenamin says he first got the idea from a Dutch group that reported using body painting to teach the location of the stomach and bowel, but has since been giving talks and workshops on it around the world.

Dr Jodi Sita of La Trobe University has been using body painting to teach anatomy to physiotherapy students after attending a workshop run by McMenamin in 2007.

"When you paint on a body the parts of a system or all the parts in an area, you have to pay attention to what is there, where it is, what orientation it is, how big it is, what lies next [to it] etc," she says.

"Figuring these things out encourages a lot of discussion, looking up references in different books, studying detail on a plastic anatomy model and even comparing your work in progress to how it looks in a cadaver specimen."

Deeper understanding
Dr Sita thinks students gain a "deeper understanding" from doing these exercises and they enjoy them too.

"Students are also really proud of their work and usually take photos of their 'artwork' using their digital cameras or mobile phones," she says.

"We also have found that the staff really enjoy these classes."

Dr Sita says the method has the added benefit of demonstrating the normal variability within human bodies.

"You just can't paint the 'textbook' picture onto everybody - as it's not one size fits all," she says.

Dr Sita plans later this year to try body painting with her Masters of Speech Pathology students to explore the anatomy of the larynx and face muscles.

Associate Professor Vaughan Kippers in medical education at the University of Queensland, who also attended a McMenamin workshop, is another who hopes to introduce the method to his classes later this year.

He says body painting is used at a number of places around the world.

Roving Performers - Human Statue Bodyart

Roving Performers - Skins Bodyart









































Human Statue Bodyart